Call for global crackdown on fake medicines

London, Nov 14: A global treaty to crack down on the deadly trade of fake medicines is urgently needed, say experts.
 Currently, there are more sanctions around the use of illegal tobacco than counterfeit drugs.
 Writing in the British Medical Journal, experts urge the World Health Organization to set up a framework akin to its one tobacco control to safeguard the public.
 WHO says more than one in every 10 drug products in poorer nations are fake.
 A third of malaria drugs are counterfeit, research suggests.
 In richer countries, medicine safety is better, but substandard and falsified drugs still cause thousands of adverse reactions and some deaths.
 Recently, in the US, contaminated drug supplies caused an outbreak of meningitis that has so far killed 16 people.

GLOBAL PROBLEM
 Amir Attaran and colleagues from the World Federation of Public Health Associations, International Pharmaceutical Federation and the International Council of Nurses, say while governments and drug companies alike deplore unsafe medicines, it is difficult to achieve agreement on action because discussions too often trespass into conflict-prone areas such as pharmaceutical pricing or intellectual property rights.
 Although some countries prohibit fake medicines under national law, there is no global treaty which means organised criminals can continue to trade using haven countries where laws are lax or absent.
 WHO estimates nearly a third of countries have little or no medicine regulation.
 In other contexts, global treaties have helped governments strengthen their laws and cooperate internationally to clamp down on havens - for example, on money laundering.
 Similarly, a new protocol under the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control requires tobacco products to be tracked and criminalises illicit trade globally - "oddly making the law tougher on cigarette falsification than on medicine falsification", says Amir Attaran.
 "The protocol will now make it a requirement to track and trace tobacco products. Cigarette packets can carry serial numbers so it is possible to track them from beginning to end.
 "If this is something you can do for a $5 cigarette packet I do not see why we can't do it for a $3,000 packet of drugs that could save your life.
 "In Canada we have seen a fake version of the heart drug Avastin come into the country that contains no active drug, just starch and nail polish remover.
 "When you are dealing with a medicine like that if there was a serial number on it you would be able to easily see if it was fake."
 WHO says it provides direct country and regional support for strengthening medicines regulation.
 And it is up to its 194 member states to decide if a treaty is the way forward.
 In 2011, a directive to protect patients from fake medicines was approved by the European Parliament. COURTESY: BBC

Lastupdate on : Wed, 14 Nov 2012 21:30:00 Makkah time
Lastupdate on : Wed, 14 Nov 2012 18:30:00 GMT
Lastupdate on : Thu, 15 Nov 2012 00:00:00 IST




  • del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Digg
  • TwitThis
  • Mixx
  • Technorati
  • Facebook
  • NewsVine
  • Reddit
  • Google
  • LinkedIn
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Print News

Enter the Security code exactly as you see it in the image security code is CaSe SeNsItIvE(Cookies must be enabled)
  • MORE FROM HEALTH

  • Kashmir

10 years on, JK Sports Council sits on ‘urgent matter’

‘Tainted’ Official Enjoys Plum Position; Government Goes Lenient

FAKE CERTIFICATE CASE

Srinagar, Nov 14: In an outrageous case of official negligence, the J&K State Sports Council has brazenly overlooked the ‘authentication of certificates’ of an official which proved that he had “mischievously More



  • Srinagar City

Omar supports skewed bridge

Says nothing wrong with Tedha design, ridicules critics

M HYDERI

Srinagar, Nov 14: Breaking his silence on the construction of “controversial” skewed bridge, Chief Minister, Omar Abdullah Wednesday said there was nothing wrong with the project and hinted that Peoples More




  • Jammu

NHPC to set up institute in Kashmir

HYDRO POWER TRAINING

GK NEWS NETWORK

Jammu, Nov 14: National Hydel Power Corporation would be establishing a hydero power training institute in Kangan area of Ganderbal. Sources said the National Power Training Institute (NPTI) will More



  • South Asia

Education now compulsory for Pakistan children

Islamabad, Nov 14: Pakistan has made education free and compulsory for children aged between five and 16. Pakistan's National Assembly Tuesday unanimously passed the right to free and compulsory education More



  • World

Hu, Wen bow out; Xi to take over as new boss

PRESS TRUST OF INDIA

Beijing, Nov 14: Chinese President Hu Jintao and Premier Wen Jiabao bowed out of the top leadership of the ruling Communist Party of China today after a 10-year stint in power, as the Party's key Congress More



  • Health

‘SCREEN CHILDREN TOO FOR DIABETES’

NOV 14 IS WORLD DIABETES DAY AND CHILDREN'S DAY

ANJALI OJHA

New Delhi, Nov 14: If you are under the impression that diabetes is an old man's disease, you are wrong. More and more children are falling prey to this lifestyle disease and doctors say it is best to More



  • Ganderbal

Maternity hospital Wayil sans medicare facilities

Patients suffer, authorities mute

Wayil (Ganderbal): Signifying messy state of affairs in Kashmir’s healthcare system, the mini- maternity hospital at Wayil here sans basis medicare facilities coupled with shortage of medicos and paramedics More



ADD
Designed Developed and Maintaned By Imobisoft Ltd /Algosol Software Solutions