ABDUCTED JAMMU SAILOR REACHES HOME

Jammu, June 25: The Jammu based sailor Narotam Kumar Sharma, who along with many others spent 10 months in the captivity of Somalian pirates, reunited with his family on Saturday.  Narota...

Jammu, June 25: The Jammu based sailor Narotam Kumar Sharma, who along with many others spent 10 months in the captivity of Somalian pirates, reunited with his family on Saturday.
 Narotam son of late Dev Dutt of Bari Brahman reached home this morning by road from Delhi with his brother and other family members.
 Describing release of their son and his colleagues' from the captivity of Somalian pirates as a rebirth, the family expressed gratitude to the Pakistani Human Right's activist Ansar Burney for making it possible.
 Narotam was among the 22 persons, including the Captain and the Chief Engineer of the Egyptian Cargo vessel which was hijacked by pirates in August 2010. 
 They were released recently after a ransom of 2.1 million dollars was paid to them by the Pak human right activist Ansar Burney and owner of the ship.
 Younger brother of Narotam, advocate Mulk Raj told Greater Kashmir that it was very unfortunate that Government of India disappointed the families of the victims and did nothing for their release.
 He said that his brother reached home alive due to efforts of Pakistani human right activist Ansar Burney, the Governor of Sindh (Pakistan) Ishrat Ali Khan and Pakistani businessmen who helped a lot  in the collection of ransom money for the release of the victims.
 "Especially, Burney did every thing in raising  the money and holding discussion with the pirates and owner of the Egyptian ship and  it is because of his sincere efforts  that  all 22 persons of different countries reunited with their families," he said.
 Out of total 22 sailors, he said, six were Indian, four Pakistani, 11 Egyptians and one Sri Lankan.
 Narotam said, "I will not   work with the Egyptian or any other foreign company again. I will prefer to work in JK or anywhere in India but will not go outside the country."
 "We had lost hope after owner of the ship expressed inability to pay the ransom," he said.
 The pirates, he said, were losing patience and used to harass the captives, especially the Captain and the Chief Engineer.
 "They also used to open fire in air to express their anger after learning that the ship owner had agreed to pay only 1 million dollars. They were dangerous. They could have killed us," he added.

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