The New Government

The New Government

Jammu and Kashmir has a bad history of coalition governments formed out of political expediencies

The uncertainty over formation of the government seems to end soon. On Tuesday, the governor, N.N. Vohra, in his Republic Day message said that after successful conduct of ‘visibly free and fair assembly elections, the people’s mandate shall very soon lead to the installation of the new government.

And present spell of the governor’s rule in the state will soon come to end.’ The fractured mandate thrown up by these elections, perhaps first of its kind fraught with communal and regional divide had put a question mark on the formation of the government. It seemed that hung assembly will end up with the announcement of fresh polls in October 2015. But all political parties irrespective of their strength in the just constituted assembly were not in favour of seeking a fresh mandate. To keep out BJP out the National Conference and the Congress leaders had floated the idea of grand alliance with the PDP. It did not find favour with the PDP. Some leaders of the PDP and the BJP endeavoured hard to cobble up a coalition of the two parties for formation of the government. Nonetheless, for immiscibility of political agendas and manifestos of the two parties it did not seem get going. The idea of coalition government of parties with contrary political beliefs had sparked a lot of debate in public and media. It seemed a contradiction, how could two parties, one in favour of abrogating of Article 370, Article 35 A, doing away with the state subject law and retention of the much hated Armed Forces Special Powers Act (AFSPA) and other having got mandate for defending the same form the government.

Now, after having entered into an alliance for contesting the Raja Sabha seats, it seems that the PDP and the BJP have worked out an arrangement for forming the government. There is no reason to disbelieve the PDP patron Mufti Muhammad Syed statement that his party will not barter away mandate of people, or enter into any Faustian agreement, just for the full term chief ministership of the State. But, scepticism amongst the people for the success of this coalition even after two parties agreeing on common minimum program is not ill-founded. Jammu and Kashmir has a bad history of coalition governments formed out of political expediencies and not with set objective of providing good governance; either crumbling after some or failing to deliver.