135-feet wide fencing on international border soon

135-feet wide fencing on international border soon

India and Pakistan shares 120 km long International Border in Jammu and 720 kilometer Line of Control in Kashmir and some districts of Jammu.

Work on the security fencing along International Border in Jammu, that separates the region from Pakistan, could take off soon as J&K Government would complete land acquisition for it by the end of March this year.

The fencing would run through 118 villages in three districts of Jammu – Kathua, Samba and Reasi – with authorities claiming it was meant to plug infiltration of militants from Pakistan side.

Directions for early acquisition of land were issued by Governor NN Vohra to Divisional authorities of Jammu while chairing a meeting of state bureaucrats in winter the capital of the state recently.

The meeting, among others, was attended by former Union Home Secretary Anil Gosawami and State Chief Secretary Iqbal Khanday.

 

“We have been directed by the Governor to complete land acquisition by the end of this March,” Divisional Commissioner Jammu, Shantmanu told Greater Kashmir.

 

He said the process has already been completed in 65 villages. He said the acquired land would be used for fencing along the border.

 

“It will be 135-feet wide fencing,” Shantmanu said. 

India and Pakistan shares 120 km long International Border in Jammu and 720 kilometer Line of Control in Kashmir and some districts of Jammu.

An official said the proposal for construction of the fencing, which would be 10 meters in height, has been lingering on for many years due to incomplete land acquisition as farmers had opposed the plan to increase the width of wall from 45 feet to 135 feet.

The official said that once the land is acquired it would be handed over to Border Security Force (BSF) for setting up the wall. The project would be funded by Union Ministry of Home Affairs.

Shantmanu said he would be monitoring land acquisition and would start visiting the districts regularly to review pace of work.

“Directions have been passed to the District Commissioners to expedite land acquisition,” the Divisional Commissioner said.

For past few years, the International Border and the Line of Control have remained tense with forces from Pakistani and Indian sides resorting to heavy exchange of firing and mortar shelling, putting the 2003-ceasefire agreement between the two countries at the risk of falling apart.