Kashmiri doctor's path breaking prostate cancer diagnosis method has wider use

Kashmiri doctor's path breaking prostate cancer diagnosis method has wider use

Hailing from Amrohi village in Karnahteshsil of district Kupwara, Prof Nabi’s achievement has bought to fore the “immense potential” Kashmiri scientists have.

A Kashmiri doctor whose path breaking new and easy method of detecting prostrate cancer in men hit global headlines recently says the method has also shown good results in detecting breast cancer and would soon be used for diagnosing other cancers like that of thyroid. “Overall it is a great advancement in ultrasound method,” said the doctor, Prof GhulamNabi, in an e-mail interview with Greater Kashmir.

“I hope it will be further explored to make it affordable to people living in far-flung areas in India and Kashmir to detect diseases earlier and get treated with intention to cure.”

Hailing from Amrohi village in Karnahteshsil of district Kupwara, Prof Nabi’s achievement has bought to fore the “immense potential” Kashmiri scientists have.

The team of researchers led by Prof Nabi has developed a new ultrasound called shear wave elastography (SWE) that can detect cancers of prostate gland, more accurately and with greater ease.

Professor Nabi heads Clinical head of Cancer Research Division at University of Dundee, Scotland.

Prostate cancer is a killer disease and one of the commonest worldwide, including India. 

Asked what his medical innovation meant for researchers in Kashmir, Prof Nabi said, “I think this (the breakthrough prostate cancer research) clearly show that Kashmiris have eagerness to work hard and prove themselves provided they are given a conducive environment.”

However, he has a word of caution for the youth in Kashmir. 

“We can make a significant difference, provided we do not look for short-cuts, focus and work hard. Rest will follow,” said Prof Nabi, who after his MBBS went to New Delhi’s AIIMS for MS in General Surgery and later MCh in Urology, topping the all-India entrance examination for the prestigious institute.

Prof Nabi later moved to UK in 2002, after passing FRCS examination of Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh. 

“It has been a long journey from a small village, Amrohi located just on LoC (Line of Control) to present!”

His six member team that took four years to complete the study published recently in The Journal of Urology will present the results in American Urology Association, San Francisco next month.