Political solution to Kashmir will take time: Dineshwar Sharma

Political solution to Kashmir will take time: Dineshwar Sharma

After concluding his three-day visit to Kashmir, Sharma left for Jammu on Thursday afternoon after meeting the former J&K Congress chief Saifuddin Soz and deputy chief minister Nirmal Singh here.

Government of India’s interlocutor on Kashmir Dineshwar Sharma said on Thursday that it will “take time” to find a political solution to the Kashmir issue. 

Talking to Greater Kashmir over phone, he said: “You cannot expect a political solution of Kashmir problem after (my) one visit to the state. The government of India has itself said that it would be a sustained dialogue. It will take time (for the political solution).”

Sharma, a former director of the Intelligence Bureau, said that he will continue to visit the state to talk to people. “I will visit the state again and again. I will continue to meet people,” he said.

Sharma refused to comment about sentiments of the people in Kashmir, but maintained that everybody in the state wants peace.  

“It will not be good for me to make a comment on this issue, but I feel that people who met me want peace,” he said.

After concluding his three-day visit to Kashmir, Sharma left for Jammu on Thursday afternoon after meeting the former J&K Congress chief Saifuddin Soz and deputy chief minister Nirmal Singh here.

Talking to reporters after meeting Sharma, Soz said that he told the interlocutor that the process of talks should be made meaningful by involving Hurriyat. “I told him that the recommendations made by different groups in the past are gathering dust,” he said. 

Soz said that he also demanded “amnesty” for youth languishing in different jails in J&K.

“Amnesty should also be given to local youth who have picked up guns. Why they should not be involved in talks?” he asked.

During his stay in Kashmir, Sharma met the National Conference working president Omar Abdullah, Congress president Ghulam Ahmad Mir and other mainstream political leaders. Besides, he also met around 50 delegations comprising mostly apolitical and lesser-known groups and non-governmental organisations.

Kashmir’s separatist groups have however refused to hold any dialogue with him, asserting that his appointment as an interlocutor was a “time-buying tactic, adopted under international pressure and regional compulsions.”  Kashmir’s apex trade bodies also refused to meet Sharma, saying they had no mandate to talk on political issues, and advised him to talk to the separatist leadership.

Sharma told reporters here yesterday that he would try his best to meet the Hurriyat leaders.