Details and procedure for admitting poor students: SHRC seeks details from top private schools

The Commission also directed these schools to file details about the procedures they adopt for admission process of students.

MUDASIR YAQOOB
Srinagar, Publish Date: Nov 17 2018 12:07AM | Updated Date: Nov 17 2018 2:21AM
Details and procedure for admitting poor students: SHRC seeks details from top private schoolsRepresentational pic

State Human Rights Commission Friday directed six reputed private schools in Srinagar to file detailed reports about quota admission to students from below poverty line families.

The six schools, including DPS Athwajan, Biscoe and Mallinson, Iqbal Memorial, New Era and GD Goenka, have been asked to submit their response within two weeks.

The Commission also directed these schools to file details about the procedures they adopt for admission process of students.

The SHRC issued the notice acting up on a petition by social activist and chairman of International Forum for Justice and Human Rights, Mohammad Ahsan Untoo, seeking “necessary directions” to these schools “in the interest of justice.”

“The aim is to know whether poor and downtrodden are being given admission in these schools as per the Supreme Court guidelines,” Untoo told Greater Kashmir, adding he also prayed before the Commission to ask heads of all the leading private schools in Kashmir to divulge whether they have installed heating gadgets for the students in their respective schools.

He has pleaded the SHRC go for on-spot inspections in all these schools.

Many parents across Kashmir have alleged that various private schools were violating norms while authorities act as mute spectators. The allegations include exorbitant tuition fee, donations on the name of admission fee and others.  

As reported earlier in Greater Kashmir, school textbooks worth Rs 200 crore are sold every year in Kashmir without any government regulation, leaving parents of children at the mercy of some top private schools that force buying at arbitrarily fixed high prices.

Many parents feel fleeced by the private schools who, it is alleged, fix textbook prices in nexus with publishers from outside the state.

Without much regulation top private schools in Kashmir have turned into “business houses”, with many also forcing parents to buy text books and school uniforms for their wards from school campuses at exorbitant rates.

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