Sky the limit

Frustration has no limits. Look how Farooq Abdulah feels for these poor stone-pelters and pleads that they be forgiven. No better news than this. The National Conference is showing a post-defeat `...

Frustration has no limits. Look how Farooq Abdulah feels for these poor stone-pelters and pleads that they be forgiven. No better news than this. The National Conference is showing a post-defeat `magnanimity' and the patron wants to build – rather rebuild – the seemingly fallen edifice of power, no matter what it takes. Those he called mahachors he can even venerate as mahatamas now. From `people don't matter' the man has taken a giant leap to another extreme where `people only matter'. What a change!
 Imagine more than five thousand young boys being punished certainly not for being innocent as many may plead. The very pattern of stone-pelting had become a public nuisance and any dispensation would turn tough on them. Those who supported stone-pelting (if asked to rule) wouldn't themselves allow it to happen. Some amount of pressure was sure needed to ensure that the calm is restored. But what did the National Conference government do? They made a grossly disproportionate use of force where a stone was countered with a bullet and stone-throwers indiscriminately shot at. Two kinds of disabilities were inflicted. One physical and the other mental with the latter being severer than the former. Slapping a penal act kills the prospect of someone's livelihood and sounds even more tyrannous than killing him straight. Young boys were booked under law with FIRs lodged against their names which stay like a permanent stain almost impossible to be washed out. 
Compare this with the cases against the law enforcing agencies which now the chief minister himself wants to reinvestigate (perhaps knowing the flawed nature of the previous investigations). How many times the issue was raised in the media and people urged the government not to push a provoked youth any further. And now Farooq Abdullah comes out to `sympathize' with these youth in a hope to win back the public sympathy. Courtesy the recent shock which he is struggling to recover from. Now he seems quite worried about the cases pending against the boys. Now he calls for a general amnesty. Now he can even promise a cabinet berth for stone-pelters if they assure him a win in the coming assembly elections.  Now sky is the limit.
The loss of power really makes one humble and generous but this expedient act of goodness can neither be called humility nor generosity. It rather is a deep sense of loss as he lost something he thought he never will.

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