India bound by international humanitarian laws in JK: PaK President

Pakistan administered Kashmir (PaK) President Sardar Muhammad Masood Khan on Saturday said India was bound by international humanitarian laws not to use brute force on unarmed civilians.
India bound by international humanitarian laws in JK: PaK President

Pakistan administered Kashmir (PaK) President Sardar Muhammad Masood Khan on Saturday said India was bound by international humanitarian laws not to use brute force on unarmed civilians.

"We not only strongly condemn flagrant human rights violations in held Kashmir and renew our resolve to strive for the emancipation of our brethren, we also call upon the international community to bring the Indian occupation forces to justice for their crimes of utmost savagery," he said at a press conference here.

He reiterated his demand that a "humanitarian corridor" should be established in Jammu and Kashmir, which had faced the longest ever curfew in the wake of the killing of Burhan Wani, resulting in acute shortage of food, medicines and other essential commodities.

He recalled that the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights had offered to send fact-finding missions to both parts of Kashmir but India had rejected the offer for being guilty.

He said he had made a similar demand during his recent UK visit that London should send an 'all party parliamentary fact finding mission' to review the human rights situation in the India held territory.

The president lamented that the UN had either been "superfluously cautious" or inactive on the situation obtaining in Kashmir, but added that Islamabad was working to break this stagnation.

"We seek immediate intercession of the UN before it is too late," he said.

Regarding his recent visit to UK and Norway, he said he had given two messages to the people he met in both countries.

"First, I asked them to help the people of Azad Kashmir and Pakistan in bringing an end to the genocide in the Jammu and Kashmir and, second, I asked them to prepare an atmosphere through diplomatic process and series of stratagems, conducive to reaching a durable solution to the lingering dispute in accordance with the wishes of the Kashmiris and ensuring peace and stability in the whole South Asian region."

The president expressed satisfaction over the performance of Pakistani missions and the diaspora in UK and Norway, saying: "Our diplomatic missions in both countries are active and the community wields influence and contacts with the locals as well as the parliamentarians."

"The leverage of diaspora emboldens us to take up our cause with the governments and institutions concerned with aplomb, but the diaspora should systemize their efforts to reap maximum benefits," he added.

The PaK president regretted that Western think tanks and media were not giving due attention to the situation in Kashmir on their own.

"But it's heartening that at least they are ready to listen to the Kashmiris. We will have to take extra efforts to draw their interest in our case," he said.

However, he claimed that the parliamentarians had full realisation of the situation and were even ready to play their role.

"In UK, most of the parliamentarians I met expressed same views like us. They believe in the early settlement of Kashmir issue and an end to the incessant human rights violations by the Indian troops," he said.

"Some even called for holding India and its occupation forces accountable for their crimes against humanity," he said.

"The statements they issue on Kashmir show a fake balance between India and Pakistan, even though it's India that has turned the region into a hotbed of confrontation," he said.

Khan maintained that bilateral talks had been held on Kashmir many a times, but this issue had an international dimension and therefore it should be settled in accordance with the UN resolutions, taking into account the wishes and aspirations of the Kashmiri people.

He said India wanted to divert attention from Kashmir and the atrocities being perpetrated by its troops.

"In order to accomplish its nefarious plans, India has not only resorted to use of indiscriminate force but is also trying to lure the Kashmiris through the so-called economic packages into withdrawing their demand for freedom," he said.

He said India had also found some allies from within the Kashmiris, such as PDP and NC, but nevertheless it had failed.

Dispelling the impression created by the Indians regarding Kashmiris' indigenous struggle, he said: "There is no terrorism in Kashmir. After the killing of Mr Wani, a new element has added to the struggle. Now their weapons are technology, like internet, and at the most stones."

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