Petchidar–the interloper

She was sophisticated and highly skilled in melting, casting, molding, shaping & polishing of the precious metals-cum-stones.
Petchidar–the interloper
Representational Pic

In the town of Tangal there was a goldsmith who had a pretty young daughter who was known for making of beautiful articles of gold and precious stones for sale at her father' shop.

She was sophisticated and highly skilled in melting, casting, molding, shaping & polishing of the precious metals-cum-stones.

She was as gentle as a sweet morning breeze and so, she would always move her soft hands gently & skillfully on the surface of an opal or a precious stone while using her tools, file & rasp, to develop, shape & polish the 'raw-stones' alchemically into wonderful ornaments to attract the buyers' eyes. Every day a thin but visible coat of gold-diamond-dust of costly metals and stones that was emitted during their processing and finishing at skilful hands of the young lady at the workshop gathered upon her fabulous face, silky-hair & shining-robes clung to her musky body. The radiance of the gold-diamond-dust-particles was always visible from her appearance like fireflies glowing in a hot summer evening.   

Opposite to the goldsmith' shop, on the other side of the main street of the Tangal town, there were a blacksmith and his young son carrying on the activity of bending, curving, molding, hammering, flattening & shaping different items of iron & steel by using their tools of hammer, jig, blower, tongs & anvil at their forge. Heaps of dust & dirt always piled up at their shop. Their untidy faces always appeared unwashed as if for months together. Their tattered clothes were shabby & porous, half burnt & half torn, due to cinders, sparks, flames, heat and smut of the forge. But in the corner of their scruffy shop, they had kept a small area off the flying ashes, smoke, soot, sparks & heat. That specified corner was actually meant & symbolised, preserved & reserved, by them for a daily-guest visiting them from the goldsmith' shop and that special daily visitor was none other than the skilled young daughter of the goldsmith. 

The moment the young lady was being observed by them coming up towards their shop, the blacksmiths duo would slow down the process of blowing the hearth, heating the metal and hammering a reddened workpiece on anvil. And, immediately on the young lady' entry into their forge, the duo of blacksmiths, father & son, would purposely halt their work, stretch flickering-smiles on their dusty-faces, increase the voltage of dim bulbs of their eyes, and their lips closed up by smut would, all of a sudden, begin opening up with a flow of flattering words for the incoming precious-guest who shone with costly gold-diamond-dust sprinkled all over her magnificent mien. They would hurriedly unfold a rolled-up soft-small-cushion (musnad) covered with a smooth satin sheet and lay it at the reserved corner of their forge entreating the special guest to sit down thereon as though a queen was being ceremonially enthroned. Then, they would formally welcome the beautiful guest with a cup of milky tea & tasty snacks, and refresh her with hand-fans; and the particles of the gold-diamond-dust would, then, slowly but surely drop down by the blowing-airflow from her mien, body & robes onto the cushion-sheet. As soon as the young lady would leave their shop, the father & the son swung into action of puckering the cushion-sheet & gathering the 'dropped-worth' of her sitting on it by shaking & brushing it off on a paper sheet spread on the floor below. A handful of costly gold-diamond-dust collected, & scoured too, was then sold by them to a jeweler in another town for a price.

The people and the other shopkeepers of Tangal town never bothered about nor noticed how the blacksmiths duo was depriving the goldsmith' young daughter of precious dust inlaying her impressive appearance. The 'heist' by the blacksmiths never attracted the attention of anyone in the Tangal town though it was being done in broad day light. Although seemingly an incongruous association between two extremes of coal–dust and gold-dust, bonhomie & comfort that had intelligibly developed between the two young hearts over a period of time was visible to all naked eyes and so, the people did not think it intelligent to dig deep into that unequal equation nor unwisely they ever contemplated of making unwarranted intrusion into the private or personal domain of the others. But sadly, there was an unwise & distasteful interloper, Petchidar, a local resident of Tangal town, who had the ugly habit of sticking his pointed nose unnecessarily into the private or personal affairs of the others which was, naturally, disliked and disapproved by those who were conscious of their right of privacy. Petchidar had been erroneously thinking of himself as an (un)appointed mayor of the Tangal town. He had been seeing the young diamond-lady visiting, sitting & enjoying her time frequently inside the blacksmith' forge which unthinkably but obviously had been vexing him too much and so, he would often unnecessarily interlope into their personal lives by asking them annoying questions of the type of 'why', 'what' & 'how' which irritated & angered them all especially the old blacksmith who was getting benefitted by gainful visiting and sitting of the young lady and the young blacksmith who had got emotionally attached to the lass. The annoyance in black hearts transformed into blacker-hatred which got transmuted into blackest-revenge of the blacksmiths. 

So, one day late in the evening when shops were shut, people & traffic were off the road, in the silence of the Tangal town, finding Petchidar all alone walking down the road, the young blacksmith, in connivance with his father, hit Petchidar with a hammer at his head. Next day morning the news of assault on the life of Petchidar broke the `yestereve' silence in the town when people were seen murmuring into each others' ears: 'unwarranted intrusion by any interloper into the affairs of the others is always laden with insidious risks besides making him foe, not friend, of all'. Even though, after few days, the black-men behind the murderous assault were nabbed & ultimately convicted of the crime, there was clearly the foregoing obvious-lesson for Petchidar, the interloper, whose life was thankfully saved by surgeons of Tangal hospital with great difficulty. 

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