Capturing the disaster

The filmmakers - for a while – suspend their emotions as fellow human beings as if untouched by the pain of the people they meet and talk to – and focus on capturing the disaster as cold professionals.
Capturing the disaster
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Documenting tragedies is the most challenging task for a filmmaker. And imagine the challenge when the tragedy is as colossal as September 2014.

The filmmakers – for a while – suspend their emotions as fellow human beings  as if untouched by the pain of the people they meet and talk to – and focus on capturing the disaster as cold professionals. Out comes a documentary titled 'September Himalayan floods: (un)avoidable deluge' – recently screened at EMRC auditorium to mark the anniversary of a catastrophe that hit us all today a year before. 

Flooding is a complex phenomenon so there cannot be one reason but plethora of reasons and causes. The documentary partially succeeds to bring forth such points. The film keeps away from the tails of valour, rescue and relief.  The SHF is a documentary that tries to question why no action was taken when it was known that floods will ravage the Valley? The documentary stimulates a viewer raising some curious and uncomfortable questions about the floods 2014. The director of the film Dr. Shahid Rasool – and the director of the centre – alongwith his co-producer Inam u Rehman (and the EMRC team) travelled across the valley to find out the reasons behind the deluge. The filmmakers have not answered questions themselves but let experts do the talking. They passage through the devastated areas, meet people and experts and explore reasons. 

Why did the city drown and could it have been saved. Why didn't the government fix the responsibility? Why wasn't the water diverted when – many believed – a diversion could have reduced the intensity of damage? Was there a cloudburst or not? What about these development projects? Who lets buildings come up so indiscriminately. Why were highways, railways and causeways laid out unplanned in a flood prone valley. This 32-minute documenta ry screened at the EMRC auditorium of the Kashmir University struck with all these questions triggering a debate amongst geo-scientists, town-planners, administrators and the audience .

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