Slapped both ways

When the story is same, the characters, the tenor, the background – everything stays unchanged. Making a joke to describe a tragedy sounds improper, but when our tragedy itself becomes a joke we are left with no other option but to laugh at the misery we have been pushed into.
Slapped both ways
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As we are seeing the action replay of 2010, many things get naturally repeated. When the story is same, the characters, the tenor, the background – everything stays unchanged. Making a joke to describe a tragedy sounds improper, but when our tragedy itself becomes a joke we are left with no other option but to laugh at the misery we have been pushed into. I quoted it in 2010 and the joke has come to revisit us six years after. 

The story is attributed to a famous Persian character Mulla Nasruddin. His daughter didn't enjoy a peaceful marital life. Her husband would beat her quite often. One day done with the daily thrashing, she decides to quit. Crying, she goes to the home of her father, her own birthplace, hoping that she will find a parental solace. Having narrated the whole story of pain and torture inflicted on her by her cruel husband, she felt relieved to find a shoulder to cry on. A father could not stand his daughter getting such an inhuman treatment from his son-in-law. He listened to the whole story patiently, stood up and slapped his daughter more ruthlessly than she might have ever been slapped by her husband. Amused and shocked at this treatment, her daughter inquires the reason behind his bizarre act of beating the beaten. And the great Nasruddin had this answer.

`Go and tell your husband, if he can beat my daughter, I can beat his wife' 

This is our story today. If one camp lets us breathe, the other comes to choke us. A relaxation by the resistance leadership is immediately followed by a curfew by the state. Omar Abdullah government did the same in 2010 to his people what Mulla Nasruddin did to his daughter. Their message to us will go like this.

`Go and tell Hurriyat that if they can cage our people for six days, we can cage their people for one day'.

Whose people we are? Can it be a way to meet the crisis. Knowing if Hartal means just an inconvenience, curfew means hell. To meet violent protests the state administration had to adopt some method to bring the situation back to normal, but stopping patients from reaching hospitals can't restore any normalcy. It can only worsen the situation. If stone pelters block the way during a shutdown call, the police does the same when it's their day. How long shall we continue to be slapped on both the sides, by both the groups. Who will listen to us?

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