Leh’s solar waste management gets mention in NITI Aayog, CSE report

Leh’s solar waste management gets mention in NITI Aayog, CSE report
The repository is the result of five months of extensive on-ground collective research initiated in July 2021.Flickr [Creative Commons]

Srinagar: The Leh union territory of Ladakh has found mention in a joint report of the NITI Aayog and the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) for its solar-powered waste management system.

Waste-wise Cities: Best practices in municipal solid waste management – a comprehensive knowledge repository of how Indian cities are managing their solid waste – was recently released by NITI Aayog Vice Chairperson Rajiv Kumar, CEO Amitabh Kant, and Special Secretary K Rajeswara Rao, along with Director General, Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), New Delhi, Sunita Narain.

The new report is the result of a country-wide study and survey jointly conducted by NITI Aayog and CSE.

The repository is the result of five months of extensive on-ground collective research initiated in July 2021.

The entire gamut of municipal solid waste management has been seen from a cross-section of 10 different aspects that explains a sustainable value chain.

These thematic aspects range from source segregation, material recovery, and technological innovations to the management of different kinds of wastes and systems such as biodegradables, plastics, e-waste, C&D waste, and landfills.

Bengaluru (Karnataka) has emerged as a leader in managing waste using Information Communications Technology solutions, and so has Kakinada in Andhra Pradesh, while Delhi and Gurugram have been upheld for their management of construction and demolition waste.

CSE and NITI Aayog would be jointly hosting workshops across the country to disseminate the learning from these best cases to other cities.

A huge number of tourists arrive in the Ladakh region every year and the numbers are only growing causing an increase in the problems of solid waste, especially plastic.

“In places like Ladakh where the terrain is difficult and the region remains isolated for the most of the year due to extreme climatic conditions, disposable plastic is quite a misfit for this region,” say activists. The piling garbage in Ladakh is also encouraging the growth of the stray dog population, posing a big threat to the snow leopards.

Authorities in Ladakh are putting in their best efforts for solid waste management.

Several activists have been demanding that plastic needs to be banned in eco-sensitive zones like Ladakh.

The usage of solar power for waste management has been successfully conducted in Leh which has won accolades at various national and international platforms.

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