The festival of joy

It is celebrated on the first day of the month of Shawal with a sentiment to express a deep sense of gratitude to Allah and at the same time express delight and joy for fulfilling the religious obligations of the third pillar of Islam (Ramdhan).
The festival of joy
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Festivals breathe fresh air into a community; fill it with joy and enthusiasm. Festivals may have different meanings for different groups; for the poor it may mean occasional festivities and splendour, while for the rich it gives them a chance to break the monotony of their daily lives. 

The festival of Eid-ul-Fitr means breaking fast after the holy month of Ramdhan. It is celebrated on the first day of the month of Shawal with a sentiment to express a deep sense of gratitude to Allah and at the same time express delight and joy for fulfilling the religious obligations of the third pillar of Islam (Ramdhan). In Islam, Eid does not mean to have merry-making at the cost of moral tenets which may make a believer to fall in the mesh or web of indecency and immorality. Eid is not also synonymous with lavish spending and pompous celebrations, but has to be confined within the contours of decency and morality. The Prophet (SAW) approved of the same. Hazrat Aisha (RA) would inject some exuberance in the celebrations of Eid and would take time out for some playing and singing with the local Ansar girls.

The festival of Eid is marked by a traditionally different Namaz. It is short and special and reserved for this particular day. Apart from consisting of two Rak'ats (units) and preferably offered in open fields, it has an additional extra six Takbirs, making it distinct from the usual.  

 Eid-ul-Fitr marks the end of the month of Ramdhan. Traditionally, the Muslim leaders and scholars in the erstwhile golden age of Muslims would feel sad as this holy month would conclude. This was simply due to the fact that they would miss the blessings and an opportunity to earn Allah's goodwill and love. Even the local population would do feel the same. There is a very famous incident of how a man wanted to fast for the entire year to keep on observing the tolerance he would observe during the month of Ramdhan. He was however, not allowed by the Prophet (SAW) as this would be against the spirit of Islam. Do such Muslims exist today? Perhaps yes; perhaps No. But the magnitude wouldn't be that high. The fact is not about fasting and observing penance for a month, but it's about the kind of spirit these people had. This very spirit is considerably lacking in this day and age. 

The occasion of Eid teaches us that we should forge unity but it is sad that we fail to receive the spirit of unity which would put the Muslim Ummah on a better pedestal of life. We as the Muslim Ummah are not able to accept the change from our within and consequently, this untouched bearing and demeanour is responsible for our termination and sufferings. The problems of the Muslim Ummah whether territorial, racial, colonial, nuclear, international or geographical are all manmade and the ultimate solution of all these could be found in the full faith and practice in the Holy Quran and in the Holy life of Prophet (SAW), for which the holy month of Ramdhan gives us full training. The Eid stresses upon the Muslim Ummah to abandon the path of indolence and invigorate themselves for a struggle to regain their lost glory. 

drfarooqpeer@gmail.com

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